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Current Business Reality: Do You Have the Courage to Confront It?

Courage to Confront the Current Business Reality

Martin Luther King eloquently shared his “I have a Dream” speech and inspired all of us to not just focus on what is possible but also the current harsh reality of racism in the 1960s in the United States.

Peter Senge, the noted management and leadership scholar coined the phrase, creative tension, to inspire all of us to focus simultaneously on both our vision and our current business reality. He said that if we only focus on vision, others could consider us to be too optimistic and naïve. Dr. Senge said if we, however, only focus on our current reality, we could become discouraged and doubtful of ever achieving our vision and goals. How does this affect our current business reality?

Dr. Senge encourages us to focus on both; our vision for what is possible for our teams and our organizations as well as simultaneously focusing on the current business reality so we are not in denial or delusional.

Jim Collins, in his book, Good to Great, writes about a conversation he had with US Navy Vice Admiral and aviator, James Bond “Jim” Stockdale who shot down over Vietnam in 1965 and was a prisoner of war for the next 7.5 years. In this discussion, Collins asked Stockdale about his coping strategy during this period of captivity. Stockdale reported, “I never lost faith in the end of this story, I never doubted not only that I would get out, but also that I would prevail in the end and turn the experience into the defining event of my life, which, in retrospect, I would not trade.”

When Collins asked Stockdale who did not make it out of Vietnam, Stockdale replied, “Oh, that’s easy, the optimists. Oh, they were the ones who said, “We’re going to be out by Christmas.” And Christmas would come, and Christmas would go. They they’d say, “We’re going to be out by Easter.” And Easter would come, and Easter would go. And then Thanksgiving, and then it would be Christmas again. And they died of a broken heart.” Stockdale then added, “This is a very important lesson. You must never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end-which can never afford to lose-with the discipline to confront the brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.

Witnessing this philosophy of duality, Jim Collins went on to describe it as the Stockdale Paradox.

I’ve seen leaders who lack the courage to confront the current business reality. Sometimes they don’t want to deal with the harsh facts or they remain naively optimistic about other people’s capacity to drive positive results regardless of the situation.

I worked for a leader early in my career that was absolutely delusional about the professionalism of his key leaders. He trusted but did he not verify. He let some of them bully him. He did refuse to acknowledge the high cost to the organization. The new leaders at all levels did not feel safe to share their concerns or even observations but he could not connect the dots to his key leaders and their styles. He hired change agents but then he allowed their peers to withhold information and resources so their success was limited or painfully prolonged. He never found his voice with his key colleagues, or at least he never demonstrated this when I worked for him.

When we remain in denial or even delusional, we tend to create a lot of chaos and confusion within our teams. When we have the courage to confront the brutal facts and take action based on those facts, we are able to create alignment at all levels. Then we find our business reality.

The key to having the courage is to focus on the facts and the data. Without the facts, it’s human nature to make up stories and put our own spin on these stories. “I know next quarter will be more robust”. “I know Bob and I know Bob didn’t mean to blow up that way in front of the team.” “I know everyone is committed to the same things.”

In order to build alignment, grow organizations and exponentially increase shareholder value, we must:

  • Get the facts backed up by data
  • Articulate to ourselves our values, our vision and our commitment to this organization
  • Find our voice so we can articulate all of this to others clearly, concisely and consistently
  • Demonstrate the courage to install consequences for bad behavior.

If you are interested in an executive dashboard in a cloud-based platform that supports everyone in staying focused on the facts in a positive, productive way let me know. We’ve analyzed them all and can give you a balanced perspective on the best ones.

Katharine Halpin has been facilitating transitions and M&A transactions since 1995. Long before that, however, she was able to identify leadership and management gaps and became a change agent leading efforts to close all those gaps.
The clients of The Halpin Companies consistently report they make more money and work fewer hours as a result of using our proprietary, proven methods to build alignment at all levels and grow shareholder value by a factor of 2-3 consistently and quickly.

Harness the Power!

The CFO is often the first to recognize the high cost of chaos. It does not appear as a line item in the financial statements. But, a CFO recognizes the warning signs. Performance, productivity, and profit fall below expectations. Rick McPartlin, co-founder and CEO of The Revenue Game, believes the cost of chaos runs as high as 30 percent of gross revenue in many organizations.  That means that if you are a $50 million company, you are wasting $15 million year after year.

Chaos means confusion: both individual confusion about what we are trying to accomplish, and team-wide disasters when people are confused about how we will accomplish it.

A CFO brought me into an organization where chaos reigned. The shareholders were happy with the return on their investments because revenue grew year over year. The company enjoyed a steady supply of new customers. By all appearances this was a very successful company.

However, the CFO was able to detect those early indicators that are always present but rarely captured. He saw that their method of driving new customer growth was unsustainable. He saw that the leadership was aging-out without new leaders being developed from within. He saw that, while they were successful, the chaos, the pace and intensity for this level of success was also not sustainable. He worried that key leaders would burnout or die before building a more sustainable business model. Their success was coming at a very high cost and he knew this model was unsustainable.

The Halpin Companies team started working with this leadership team to gather information and identify alternative approaches.

Fairly quickly, using our methods, we identified a potential future CEO from within the ranks. At first, the current leadership team was disdainful of our recommendation but this candidate did emerge over time as the key player with the greatest leadership capacity. He currently serves successfully in that CEO role.

More importantly, we were able to work with the two top layers of leaders and, based on our recommendations, build a more inclusive and transparent approach to driving new customer relationships.

Through mentoring by the senior leaders and using this more inclusive approach the former #1 sales person was able to build a dozen sales executives with his same level of success.

Using our processes he was first able to articulate his values – he cared deeply about their customers. He then started to articulate his sales approach – he was an extraordinary listener. We then helped him document and communicate his organic sales approach in meaningful and easy to understand ways. Over time, in one-on-one mentoring sessions, he trained each of his key people to replicate his success.

Not everyone had the same capacity but 14 or his 22 colleagues were able to step up. As a result the company grew by 300% in a few short years because of this velocity.

The CFO was thrilled, the shareholders were thrilled and more importantly, this construction-related company was able to sustain the economic downturn and continues to thrive today.

Six of the other colleagues self-selected out of this company with their dignity intact. Why did the go away? They saw that they could not be successful in the new business model. Two other leaders came to the leadership team and asked to take a step sideways or even backwards. They knew intuitively that they could not be successful in the new business model, given their own strengths.

When you harness the power you already have within your organization, the results will be extraordinary. Often our clients experience growth in shareholder value in amounts that were never imagined or forecasted. Building alignment, inclusiveness, and transparency drive success.

 

The Halpin Companies has been facilitating transitions in organizations of all sizes and levels of complexity since 1995. Our proven methods create work environments and corporate cultures where shareholder value grows consistently. Learn more about our methods at www.HalpinCompany.com

For a complimentary consultation, contact Katharine Halpin at 602-266-1961 or [email protected]

 

 

 

 

Greatest Source of Stress? Un-negotiated Expectations. How to fix!

Alignment for Success – a 5-Part Book Review

I wrote my book, Alignment for Success; Bringing Out the Best in Yourself, Your Teams and Your Company in an effort to spread the word about my unique methodology for being a Strategic Leader.

 

I am thrilled with the response and feedback to this important book.  Jerre Stead, Chair and CEO of IHS, Inc. (who has served as CEO of 7 publicly held companies over his career) gives the book as a gift and tells people “this is what I believe”.

 

Jason Pistillo, President of the University of Advancing Technology, asked me to bring my book into their advanced curriculum because, as he stated, “we want to use the most contemporary thinking about leadership.”

 

And just recently Abbie S. Fink launched a 5-part Book Review.  Abbie is a leader in the business community in Phoenix and frequently reviews books for their blog at HMA Public Relations.

 

I’m so pleased to share Part 1 of her Book Review with each of you here:

http://hmapr.com/bookclub-alignment-success-bringing-best-teams-company-part-1-alignment/

 

Here’s Part 2 from @AbbieSFink:

 

http://hmapr.com/bookclub-alignment-success-bringing-best-teams-company-part-2-driving-force/

 

Here’s Part 3 from @AbbieSFink:

 

http://hmapr.com/bookclub-alignment-success-bringing-best-teams-company-part-3-make-meeting-time/

 

 

Here’s Part 4 from @AbbieSFink:

 

http://hmapr.com/bookclub-alignment-success-bringing-best-teams-company-part-4-attitude-gratitude/

 

Here’s Part 5 from @AbbieSFink:

 

http://hmapr.com/bookclub-alignment-success-bringing-best-teams-company-part-5-creating-culture-high-performance/

 

 

Thanks so much Abbie for this extraordinary contribution to making work work for everyone!

3 Requirements of C-Suite Transitions In Today’s VUCA Environment

Tsunami

The United States is experiencing unprecedented numbers of transitions in the C-Suite in part due to the retirement of baby boomers. There are significant risks to our economy and to organizations if these transitions do not occur in a strategic, well-thought-out manner. These risks include:

1. Decelerated organizational growth caused by unmitigated risks or a lack of strategic alignment.
2. Unsustainable defined benefit retirement plans.
3. Negative social impact on local communities if new leaders do not share the long-term values of an organization such as investing in the local community and economy.

 

How can current leaders prepare for this tsunami of volatility and change? How can organizations innovate at the level that is now required while simultaneously introducing new leadership?

How can new leaders absorb their significant responsibilities and guarantee the organization can sustain success? The solutions to these challenges are simple but not easy. These solutions, while simple, do require building a strategic framework for a well-thought-out process that includes experimentation, reflection to capture learnings and then more experimentation.

A successful transition at any level requires numerous iterations of these simple steps.

Here are the three required components for a successful C-Suite transition:

1. A collective mindset is required, one that allows every leader to focus equally on both the current reality of the environment from a variety of perspectives (not just historical financial and productivity metrics) and the Vision and Growth Plan. A balanced perspective is formed based on metrics, data, and substantive stakeholder input. If leaders focus only on the current reality, the pace of change, the required innovation, and the challenges to manage human capital, they can easily be overwhelmed by the magnitude of these challenges. If they only focus on the Vision and Growth Plan without putting them in the context of the current challenges, leaders can be in denial or even delusional about the gap between where an organization is and what is required to take that organization to the next level of success during volatile times.
2. A current leadership team that is high performing and shares a commitment to not only the organization’s success but to each colleague’s individual success is absolutely required. Without this level of commitment, decisions can be made that have unintended negative consequences to another part of the organization. With this level of commitment, win/win solutions will emerge. This shared commitment requires an investment of time. Win/win solutions are not attainable without the time to thoughtfully align around decisions.
3. Having the right leaders with the right strengths in the right roles is fundamental. Many leaders today have been promoted because of their ‘individual contributor’ skills and expertise. While being an expert accountant or auditor or engineer is a tremendous foundation on which to build a career in leadership, our pace of change requires leaders who are committed to successful executive transitions and who are
• resilient,
• flexible,
• innovative,
• good communicators,
and most importantly can bring out the best in others so they build cultures where stakeholders at all levels feel engaged, empowered, and encouraged.

For more thoughtful articles that reflect this, please see:

21st Century’s Most Valuable Assets

“The good news is that accelerating change, creative destruction, and new business models are all opportunities for the venturesome. A unifying theme as the economy transforms is that in almost every business, barriers to entry are coming down. Opportunity is more widely available than ever. Every person and every organization can possess the 21st century’s most valuable assets:
• openness to new ideas,
• ingenuity, and
• imagination.”

Why Every Aspect of Your Business
is About to Change
Geoff Colvin
Fortune Magazine
October 22, 2015

 

If you want to drive your company’s transitions in a strategic, proactive manner, bring in a trusted advisor beyond the normal scope of investment bankers, CPAs and attorneys. It is important to help keep the “people part” of the merger or acquisition on track.

 

We strongly encourage you to bring in experienced professionals with a track record of accelerating growth during transitions. If you have any questions or if we can be of service, we may be reached at 602-266-1961 or via our website at www.HalpinCompany.com

 

 

About Katharine Halpin

 

Katharine Halpin has been facilitating transitions in organizations of all sizes since 1995. She founded The Halpin Companies in an effort to fill a void she saw everyday in her CPA career. “Transactions fail to accomplish the forecasted goals simply because no one is focused on getting the right people in the right roles driving the right results right away.”

 

She has amassed a suite of tools and methods to exponentially increase the value of an organization by actually leveraging the transition. Many of the clients of The Halpin Companies have realized growth of 200% to 300% as they prepare for a transaction and move powerfully through the transition.

 

For more information or to discuss this in more depth, contact Katharine at (602) 266-1961 or [email protected]

Quantum Leap Results Require Certain Things

I wrote last week on my perspective on the requirements for Quantum Leap Results for Teams.  Today I want to focus on what it takes for us as individual leaders to consistently generate these kinds of results for ourselves and our teams.

For me, self-care is at the top of the list.  Without my consistent self-care, I don’t have the awareness to consistently make good decisions and communicate those decisions effectively and concisely.  Just ask my colleagues here at The Halpin Companies.  They can give you an ear-full about those times when I have not been faithful to my self-care.

In order to do the self-care like yoga, stretching, hiking, biking, spending time in Nature, I have to value myself as much as I value others.  This requires saying YES to my big vision for myself and for The Halpin Companies.  As Stephen Covey said, “You have to decide what your highest priorities are and have the courage – pleasantly, smilingly, nonapologetically – to say ‘no’ to other things.  And the way to do that is by having a bigger ‘yes’ burning inside”.

I would say the Vision must be focused on the Quantum Leaps. That’s what Covey means by the ‘bigger yes burning inside’.

We have to give ourselves the gifts of self-care and a variety of ‘reserves of time’ to think, prepare, process.  When we give ourselves these gifts consistently and thoughtfully, the Quantum Leap Results come!  Not only do we create results that are sudden and dramatic, but we generate these results strategically, systematically and almost effortlessly.

Where could you benefit from a Quantum Leap Result today?

What’s missing in your self-care and think time that is needed to generate that Quantum Leap?

What’s the bigger ‘yes’ burning inside?  Value yourself enough to prioritize it today.

What is Required to Consistently Generate Quantum Leap Results?

From my perspective, we all want Quantum Leap Results but we don’t achieve them consistently because of a few simple things.

We must be willing to get out of our comfort zone and have honest, forthright conversations.

We must be willing to shift our mindset about others, our circumstances and situations.

We must be willing to play bigger, create environments where others are able to bring their best self and demonstrate the daily discipline to do it all again tomorrow,

It’s so simple but not easy.  Quantum Leap Results require self-care, self-awareness, self-management and self-leadership.

Ask yourself these questions?

What is missing in my self-care?  What kind of self-management would be required to generate some Quantum Leap Results?

It is not Rocket Science.

How big do you want yo play today?

2013 Resolutions by Dear Abbey

This is something I intend to reflect on daily in 2013.  Dear Abbey (Pauline Phillips) adapted this from the original Al-Anon Credo.  It speaks for itself….

Just for today, I will live through this day only.  I will not brood about yesterday or obsess about tomorrow.  I will not set far-reaching goals or try to overcome all of my problems at once. 

I know that I can do something for 24 hours that would overwhelm me if I had to keep it up for a lifetime. 

Just for today, I will be happy.  I will not dwell on thoughts that depress me.  If my mind fills with clouds, I will chase them away and fill it with sunshine.

Just for today, I will accept what is.  I will face reality.  I will correct those things that I can correct and accept those I cannot.

Just for today, I will improve my mind.  I will read something that requires effort, thought and concentration.  I will not be a mental loafer.

Just for today I will make a conscious effort to be agreeable.  I will be kind and courteous to those who cross my path, and I will not speak ill of others.  I will improve my appearance, speak softly, and not interrupt when someone else is talking.  Just for today I will refrain from improving anybody but myself.   

Why Some Executive Demonstrate Bad Behavior

Brian Evje had a recent piece in Inc. Magazine titled, “Why Executives Are So Bad At The Behavioral Side of Management”.

After a 40-year career, I certainly do not believe that all execs are bad at the ‘soft’ skill issues (which we all know are really the hard issues to address).

Mr. Evje states that “In reality, there is nothing ‘soft’ about the skills need to relate to people well enough to lead them.  True leadership involves both hard skills and harder skills”.  I love this quote.

He summarizes that there are ultimately 3 things leaders have to do to be more effective:

1) Admit that inter-personal skills are important.  He even posits that we must be able to lead ourselves.  I call this self-management.  Being able to bring the required perspective to every situation and to do this ‘in the moment’ requires presence, discipline, thoughtfulness and a feeling of being grounded.  Humans don’t gain this ability without getting exercise, getting out in nature, taking think time, and having a variety of reserves of time in place every day..

2) Rethink your definitions of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ skills.  He’s got great questions to ask yourself.  See the full article here:  http://www.businessinsider.com/successful-leadership-skills-2012-11

3) Get some help.  As a Leadership Strategist for almost 18 years, I, of course, love this idea.  Just like in sports, we don’t know what we don’t know about our levels of effectiveness. An outsider can help you raise your awareness and ultimately, make different choices.

When I re-tweeted this article yesterday, one of my Facebook friends added a comment that most execs put their self-interest over the interest of their employees, companies, communities.  Again, I don’t agree with the broad generalization.  I have seen more execs do this than I’d like to admit. However, the key here is to only hire values-based people and people who share your values.  If you value transparency, figure out what questions to ask in the interview to assess the applicant’s perspective on transparency.  If you value integrity, ask them to share an experience when they’ve been asked to compromise their integrity.  The interview might  be very short based on their response to this question.

If you enjoy these posts, you probably would enjoy our free report, 7 Secrets to Making More While Working Less at www.teamalignmentstrategies.com

 

 

 

Execution is Not Easy! If it was, everyone would be doing it…even the US Air Force

How can really bright people screw up to the tune of $1 billion?

Our colleagues in the US Air Force were successful in just that.

They selected a software vendor in 2006 to “configure, deploy and conduct training and change management activities” related to a $628 million contract for an off-the-shelf enterprise-wide software system.  Randall Stross, a Silicon Valley author and professor at San Jose State University, captures the details in Sunday’s New York Times.  He quotes an Air Force executive,  laying the groundwork for this debacle by 2010, “We’ve never tried to change all the processes, tools and languages of all 250,000 people in our business at once, and that’s essentially what we are about to do.”

Mr. Stross attributes the failure to endless meetings, complex bureaucratic requirements and the constant need to fight wars.  My assessment of the situation is much simpler.

My experience working with leadership teams for over 30 years tells me that the team’s Vision and planning process was flawed.

This is what happens when the collective attitudes and beliefs are not addressed as part of the vision process.  This is what happens when the vision cannot be articulated or is not embraced by every member of the team.  These are the obstacles to almost every planning process.  When the planning process is flawed, no amount of expertise in execution can bring an initiative to a productive close.

If you would like to align your team around a vision for a $1 billion initiative or something smaller in scope for 2013, get our free report at www.teamalignmentstrategies.com

Here’s the full article in the Sunday business section of the  New York Times: http://nyti.ms/YOI6CF  It’s worth a read.

Self Awareness – A Key to Turning Obstacles into Opportunities

In Sunday’s NYTimes’ Corner Office by Adam Bryant, Tony Tjan, Founder and CEO of Cue Ball, a Venture Capital Firm in Boston offers extraordinarily valuable insights.

I thought his most poignant point, in talking about the dot-com buts of 2000 was that “…self-awareness trumps all.  You need to know what your superhero strength is, but you really learn at tougher times what your and others’ weaknesses are.”

His point is like that Hallmark Card that says something like people are like tea bags.  You never really know them until you put them in hot water.

What does it take to have a level of resiliency that allows us to bounce back from setbacks and obstacles?  What kinds of self-management tools do we need to practice consistently so that when an obstacle arises we can easily circumvent it?

A key self-management tool for many of us is Strategic Think Time.  I’d encourage you today to give yourself this gift to read and reflect on this piece.  Here’s the link:  http://nyti.ms/YOzNGN

 

Get the Right People in the Right Roles Can be Messy!

How do we get the right people in the right roles?

In addition to gaining a full understanding of people’s strengths, we need to have clarity about each other’s vulnerabilities.  I believe our vulnerabilities, or growth opportunities, fall into several categories:

* Risks when we simply get the volume turned up too high on our strengths

* Unmet needs that can unconsciously drive us to make poor choices and decisions that have negative consequences, and of course,

* our egos.

How do we then get the right people in the right roles doing the right work using the right strengths and managing their growth opportunities or vulnerabilities?

First, you need to know the strengths of your people.  We use a proprietary tool developed by Lynn Taylor of Taylor Protocols to identify strengths and vulnerabilities of individuals.  This affirming profile helps people see themselves in a new light.  More importantly, it helps the rest of the team and their manager have a much more realistic perspective on the individual.

Thomas Leonard, founder of Coach U and one of the founders of the profession of coaching, articulated that we all have needs.  When these needs are left to fester they can become significant obstacles to effectiveness.  For almost 20-years I had a need to ‘get credit’.  That need drove me to be irrational at times. I would volunteer for every difficult assignment.  I would raise my hand to serve on every task force or committee.  When I started my training at Coach U and saw this need, my life and career transformed.  With awareness  and self-management, I was no longer ‘driven’ to get that need met.

What’s your unmet need?  Do you have a need to be the smartest person in the room? Do you have the need to be liked? Do you have the need to be validated? Do you have the need for external recognition?  Do you have the need to be heard? Do you have the need to be part of ‘the team’?

Every human being has these needs.  The question is are they driving us in an invisible and unproductive way?

Can we gain this awareness about ourselves or will we remain driven by these underlying growth opportunities?  Can we then self-manage in a way that gets these needs met or at least keeps them in check?

Once you know who you are dealing with you on your team and the various aspects of each team member, it’s easy to ensure their roles play to their strengths.

The next step is to ensure that everyone demonstrates both the personal and professional maturity to develop themselves, self-manage and embrace these growth opportunities.

For our free report, Make More Money While Working Less click here: teamalignmentstrategies.com

 

Vision vs Execution

As Thomas Edison said, “Vision without Execution is Hallucination”.  In today’s world with our addictions to activity, we now know that Execution without Vision is CHAOS!  In some organizations, it can be total chaos.

Without a Shared Vision, everyone on the team develops their own.  Unfortunately, they don’t stop there.  People take action often based, not on the Facts but on the stories they make up about the facts.

Without a shared, clear, concise vision, chaos reigns.

How do you develop such a vision?  Only by including all the stakeholders in a thoughtful multi-step process.  So many any leaders lack the discipline to adopt such a process.  They believe, incorrectly, they will be more effective being in action.

What has to happen for us all to be willing to invest in the process if developing this Shared Vision with our stake holders?  What would be the benefits?  What is the personal and corporate cost of the chaotic approach?

Getting the Right People in the Right Roles Requires Hiring The Right People in the First Place

Yesterday’s Corner Office Interview by Adam Bryant in the Sunday Business Section of the New York Times hit the ball out of the ballpark.  Sandra Kurtzig is Chair and CEO of Kenandy, a software management firm in Redwood City, CA.

She had a number of very valuable points.  The title is Don’t Chase Everything That Shines and she speaks about the need to have good boundaries and high standards.  Not every idea is, in fact, a good idea!

The most compelling pieces to me were her hiring questions.  She asks “Why are you here? What do you know about our company that made you want to interview for this job?”  She says if they have not done their homework about her company that’s a real red flag for her.

An even more important interview question is this: “Why do you want to leave the company you’re at right now? Looks like you’re doing a pretty good job, and you’re doing well.  What is it that you don’t like there?”

She says the answer to this question is ALWAYS an eye-opener.  She uses this to mine for their perspective on a number of topics.

I highly recommend the entire piece.  It will take all of about 3 minutes to fully digest.  It will take some extended period of time, however, for most of us to build in the discipline and clarity that Ms. Kurtzig demonstrates.

See the full article here: http://nyti.ms/VcZ5qn

If you enjoy our blog posts, you’ll love our free report, The 7 Secrets to Making More Money and Working Less.  Go to www.TeamAlignmentStrategiest.com for your free copy.

Gratitude Week – Are we controlling our own destiny?

Sometimes life is hard.  Our loved ones become ill or even transition on.  We have health challenges ourselves.  People we care about lose their jobs and their homes, often for no fault of their own.

Sometimes, we just can’t sleep or relax.

Whatever we are faced with we still retain the opportunity to look for the silver lining.  While hokey, this is really our only productive approach.

When we adopt the victim mindset, we give control of our destiny over to someone else.  When we maintain a productive mindset and look for the growth opportunities and even the blessings, we remain effective and we move forward.

This week I’ll be writing about other aspects of gratitude that are important and useful for us all.

If you are enjoying these posts, I’m confident you would enjoy one of our free webinars on Total Team Alignment.  These webinars are filled with useful, practical and easy to implement solutions that produce record results right away.  I hope you’ll join us for one.  Here’s the link to register:

www.HalpinCompany.com/webinars

Please have a wonderful holiday season filled with lots of love, laughter and real rejuvenation!