Business Growth Strategies

Business Growth Strategies For Companies of All Sizes & Levels of Complexity

Since 1995 we at The Halpin Companies have been able to facilitate business growth strategies for a variety of companies in a variety or industries. Our clients historically brought us in to facilitate a CEO or key leader transition or to help the founders be strategic about making their exit. Regardless of the original purpose of the engagement, across the board, we’ve been able to help our clients accelerate the growth of their companies by using our proprietary business growth strategies.

Our proprietary methods are based on simple, practical, but not always easy approaches. Business growth strategies are not complicated. However, they do require leaders to be open to using new and different approaches. What got you hear won’t get you there” according to Marshall Goldsmith, the noted leadership guru.

In order to be strategic about growing a business, a few key things must occur.

First and foremost, we must have a clear assessment of the current reality. What are the motivations of the shareholders? What roles are people currently playing? What expectations do the shareholders have about the continuation of the company beyond their own leadership? Who aspires to assume more leadership within the company and are they positioned properly? What is the current level of leadership and management effectiveness of each key executive and manager? What specific strengths does each key player possess? Do these key players demonstrate behaviors on a daily basis that indicate they are ‘walking their talk’ with the purpose and mission of the organization and their own strengths and values?

Once this information can be gathered, leaders can start to formulate next steps. These next steps must include developing a Vision for any transition or transaction. Do the shareholders want to focus intentionally on the growth? How much growth? How will this growth be measured? Revenues, Profits, Shareholder Value?   Business growth strategies require clarity. Without clarity of vision, you have chaos.

Erika Andersen eloquently shares in her book, Leading So People Will Follow, Steve Jobs ‘ high degree of skill in providing this clarity of vision, or what she calls farsightedness.

‘One stunning example of this kind of farsightedness is how Steve Jobs operated at the start of Apple. When Jobs and Wozniak founded Apple Computers in 1976, the personal computer was still new and untested. Moreover, the idea that almost everyone would one day have a computer and that computers would be as accessible and easy-to-use as televisions or telephones seemed like craziness.

But then along came these two young men with exactly these ideas. And Jobs, especially, continued to articulate this possible future in a way that brought together capital, a workforce, and a marketing plan that ultimately led to the achievement of the future he envisioned thirty-five years ago.

The essence of farsightedness is not only envisioning a possible successful future but also articulate it in a way that’s both compelling and inclusive. Compelling means that it’s meaningful to those who hear it, that it’s attractive to them. Inclusive means they want to help make it happen and feel they can have an important part to play in moving toward it.

Clearly Steve Jobs was able to express his vision for the future in this way. In January 1984, when Jobs introduced the first Macintosh computer at Apple’s annual shareholders’ meeting, an attendee described the level of enthusiasm as “pandemonium.” As the first commercially successful small computer with a graphical user interface, the Macintosh represented, and still represents, the realization of a vision that was both compelling and inclusive.

Will this shareholder value occur through acquisitions, mergers or organically within the company? Often, we recommend initially experimenting with two approaches simultaneously to ‘test the waters’. Different leaders will be inclined to be successful within different models and it’s important to assess each key leaders ability to move productively through change and even chaos.

According to Nelson Mandela, “Vision without action is just a dream, action without vision just passes the time, and vision with action can change the world.  Don’t let your company’s growth potential by stymied by incongruence of your visions, plans and business growth strategies.

For more information about our 100-Day Program and the six components that accelerate growth, using our proprietary business growth strategies, please contact Katharine Halpin at 602-266-1961 or via email at [email protected] Follow Katharine on Twitter at KatharineHalpin and LinkedIn.  For more information about how to build alignment at all levels of your organization, read Katharine’s book, Alignment for Success: Bringing Out the Best in Yourself, Your Teams and Your Company.

If you are preparing for a merger, acquisition or organic growth, contact us for a complimentary, confidential consultation!

 

 

Investment Banking

Investment Banking Drives Mergers and Acquisitions. Is their Approach the Best Approach?

The process of capital formation in the 19th century was markedly different between the British capital market and the American capital market. British industrialists were readily able to satisfy their need for capital by tapping a vast source of international capital through British banks such as Westminster’s, Lloyds and Barclays.

In contrast, the dramatic growth of the United States created capital requirements that far outstripped the limited capital resources of American bank after the Civil War.

Investment banking in the United States emerged to serve the expansion of railroads, mining companies, and heavy industry. Unlike commercial banks, investment banks were not authorized to issue notes or accept deposits. I

Instead, they served as brokers or intermediaries, bringing together investors with capital and the firms that needed that capital.

Even now, 150-years later, Investment Banking is a key driver and growth engine for the US economy because Investment Banking experts still serves as brokers and intermediaries.

While investment banking is a critical resource to grow our economy, to drive real innovation and sustainable transformation of business, we must expand the scope of the typical process, driven by investment banking, during a merger or acquisition.

The investment banking role is to facilitate the due diligence process to bring investors and companies together. The glitch occurs when their narrow focus is limited to the legal and financial aspects. Little effort or attention is given by the investment bankers to the people aspects.

For example, now one asks these questions:

  • How will we align our senior management team so they can speak with one voice?
  • How can we gain the buy-in and trust of all the employees?
  • How can we crystalize and communicate our purpose in a way that is meaningful to our employees?
  • How can we prioritize and make decisions in a way that is consistent with our purpose and our values yet narrows our focus?
  • How can we engage the hearts and the minds of our teams?
  • How can we grow this company so that everyone wins;
    • Our shareholders?
    • Our teams?
    • Our customers?

By maintaining a narrow, limited perspective, deals get closed every day. The question for these investors is; “are these deals that will grow a company?”

KPMG has reported since 1999 that 83% of mergers and acquisitions fail. These deals don’t blow up necessarily but they do fail to achieve the forecasted growth in revenue, profit and shareholder value.

If Investment Banking experts could simply expand the scope of their focus, so much more growth could occur in the US economy immediately.

In our e-book, we describe eight important steps to be considered during the standard approach to due diligence by investment banking experts. Here are three of those steps:

  1. We suggest strongly that newly acquired companies avoid layoffs at all costs. While this may be the ‘quick and dirty’ way to slash and burn overhead and redundant administrative costs, the fallout can last as long as a decade.

Do you want your front line people to feel safe to innovate, to ask questions and to express even their smallest concerns? Or would you prefer they stand around the proverbial water-cooler and gossip about the latest hint that another layoff is pending. Your employees will not be able to bring their best, most focused selves after a lay-off. It is simply too traumatic for those retained.

  1. Assess the current leadership and management teams of the acquiring company and the company to be acquired or merged. By understanding the strengths, values and motivations of each key player you can build alignment from the earliest discussions.

Without alignment, you will have key executives who put their own self-interest in front of the organization’s interest, simply because they have not aligned with their colleagues around a shared purpose.

  1. Use strategic approaches. When we allow ourselves to become reactive we turn over control of our destiny and the destiny of this new entity to others. Either:
  • Regulators,
  • Wall Street Analysts,
  • Activist shareholders or
  • Those we don’t see or share our vision.

When we are in reactive mode, we simply cannot remember to focus on the big picture and the long-term opportunity and possibility. We are too busy putting out fires and reacting to the issues that appear to be urgent but, in the long run, are not going to add value.

If you are racing from meeting to meeting with little time to think strategically or prepare for important decisions, you will not notice the red flags. When a company is losing it’s potential for growth, key indicators are everywhere. The question is this: Can you see the key indicators when they are slight, intuitive hunches or do you have to wait until the company faces a financial crisis to wake up? To you want to blame others are do you want to drive yours and the company’s future growth potential?

Investment Banking is a critical piece to growing our economy. However, investment banking experts and shareholders everywhere must be open to taking a broader perspective.

 

About the Author:

Katharine Halpin, founder of The Halpin Companies, has been facilitating transitions and transactions since 1995. Her earlier career as a CPA taught her the importance of considering not just the financial and legal aspects of a transaction but also the people and cultural aspects.

If you’d like to receive a complimentary copy of our e-book, 8 Ways to Avoid Becoming a Statistic, email Katharine Halpin at [email protected]

If you are interested in a complimentary, confidential discussion about a pending, current or recent merger or acquisition, please call 602-266-1961 or click to schedule.

 

 

Business Reality

Current Business Reality: Do You Have the Courage to Confront It?

Courage to Confront the Current Business Reality

Martin Luther King eloquently shared his “I have a Dream” speech and inspired all of us to not just focus on what is possible but also the current harsh reality of racism in the 1960s in the United States.

Peter Senge, the noted management and leadership scholar coined the phrase, creative tension, to inspire all of us to focus simultaneously on both our vision and our current business reality. He said that if we only focus on vision, others could consider us to be too optimistic and naïve. Dr. Senge said if we, however, only focus on our current reality, we could become discouraged and doubtful of ever achieving our vision and goals. How does this affect our current business reality?

Dr. Senge encourages us to focus on both; our vision for what is possible for our teams and our organizations as well as simultaneously focusing on the current business reality so we are not in denial or delusional.

Jim Collins, in his book, Good to Great, writes about a conversation he had with US Navy Vice Admiral and aviator, James Bond “Jim” Stockdale who shot down over Vietnam in 1965 and was a prisoner of war for the next 7.5 years. In this discussion, Collins asked Stockdale about his coping strategy during this period of captivity. Stockdale reported, “I never lost faith in the end of this story, I never doubted not only that I would get out, but also that I would prevail in the end and turn the experience into the defining event of my life, which, in retrospect, I would not trade.”

When Collins asked Stockdale who did not make it out of Vietnam, Stockdale replied, “Oh, that’s easy, the optimists. Oh, they were the ones who said, “We’re going to be out by Christmas.” And Christmas would come, and Christmas would go. They they’d say, “We’re going to be out by Easter.” And Easter would come, and Easter would go. And then Thanksgiving, and then it would be Christmas again. And they died of a broken heart.” Stockdale then added, “This is a very important lesson. You must never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end-which can never afford to lose-with the discipline to confront the brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.

Witnessing this philosophy of duality, Jim Collins went on to describe it as the Stockdale Paradox.

I’ve seen leaders who lack the courage to confront the current business reality. Sometimes they don’t want to deal with the harsh facts or they remain naively optimistic about other people’s capacity to drive positive results regardless of the situation.

I worked for a leader early in my career that was absolutely delusional about the professionalism of his key leaders. He trusted but did he not verify. He let some of them bully him. He did refuse to acknowledge the high cost to the organization. The new leaders at all levels did not feel safe to share their concerns or even observations but he could not connect the dots to his key leaders and their styles. He hired change agents but then he allowed their peers to withhold information and resources so their success was limited or painfully prolonged. He never found his voice with his key colleagues, or at least he never demonstrated this when I worked for him.

When we remain in denial or even delusional, we tend to create a lot of chaos and confusion within our teams. When we have the courage to confront the brutal facts and take action based on those facts, we are able to create alignment at all levels. Then we find our business reality.

The key to having the courage is to focus on the facts and the data. Without the facts, it’s human nature to make up stories and put our own spin on these stories. “I know next quarter will be more robust”. “I know Bob and I know Bob didn’t mean to blow up that way in front of the team.” “I know everyone is committed to the same things.”

In order to build alignment, grow organizations and exponentially increase shareholder value, we must:

  • Get the facts backed up by data
  • Articulate to ourselves our values, our vision and our commitment to this organization
  • Find our voice so we can articulate all of this to others clearly, concisely and consistently
  • Demonstrate the courage to install consequences for bad behavior.

If you are interested in an executive dashboard in a cloud-based platform that supports everyone in staying focused on the facts in a positive, productive way let me know. We’ve analyzed them all and can give you a balanced perspective on the best ones.

Katharine Halpin has been facilitating transitions and M&A transactions since 1995. Long before that, however, she was able to identify leadership and management gaps and became a change agent leading efforts to close all those gaps.
The clients of The Halpin Companies consistently report they make more money and work fewer hours as a result of using our proprietary, proven methods to build alignment at all levels and grow shareholder value by a factor of 2-3 consistently and quickly.

The High Cost of Not Taking Action….

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Less than 2 minutes to read:
In times of great challenges or change of any kind, it is easy to hunker down, withdraw and attempt to white knuckle it.
“Our run rate doesn’t allow any investments at this time.” 
“Our revenues can barely service our debt so we have to wait until more debt is retired before we can make investments.”
“We have to fill 1-2 more key positions and then our team will be ready to take on new strategic initiatives.”
Yes…all these excuses, justifications and rationales make sense if you want to continue to do what you have always done.
However, if you are ready for transformational growth, ready to use new and different approaches, ready to shake folks out of their comfort zone then let’s talk.
The only sustainable approach to transformational growth is by building alignment at all levels.  If you delay making the investment to shake things up, you delay the growth potential.
In order to build the degree of alignment that will establish a solid platform for growth, we must be willing to get out of our own comfort zone, create environments for our colleagues to feel safe getting out of their comfort zones and be open to using new and different approaches, regardless of the risk.  High risk equates to high rewards.
Until we get everyone focused on our top 3 strategic growth priorities, communicate this clear focus in a way that engages every employee, contractor, supplier and vendor and get the right people in the right roles, we will never be ready because we will never have a solid foundation for transformational growth.
As Walt Disney said so eloquently, “The only way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.”
Don’t wait another day to start to build the foundation you need so you can achieve the profitable, sustainable growth you deserve.
The Halpin Companies have been facilitating mergers, acquisitions and management/leadership transitions since 1995.  Our clients experience transformational growth that results in greater shareholder value.  For a complimentary, confidential consultation, contact Katharine Halpin at [email protected] or 602-266-1961.

Harness the Power!

The CFO is often the first to recognize the high cost of chaos. It does not appear as a line item in the financial statements. But, a CFO recognizes the warning signs. Performance, productivity, and profit fall below expectations. Rick McPartlin, co-founder and CEO of The Revenue Game, believes the cost of chaos runs as high as 30 percent of gross revenue in many organizations.  That means that if you are a $50 million company, you are wasting $15 million year after year.

Chaos means confusion: both individual confusion about what we are trying to accomplish, and team-wide disasters when people are confused about how we will accomplish it.

A CFO brought me into an organization where chaos reigned. The shareholders were happy with the return on their investments because revenue grew year over year. The company enjoyed a steady supply of new customers. By all appearances this was a very successful company.

However, the CFO was able to detect those early indicators that are always present but rarely captured. He saw that their method of driving new customer growth was unsustainable. He saw that the leadership was aging-out without new leaders being developed from within. He saw that, while they were successful, the chaos, the pace and intensity for this level of success was also not sustainable. He worried that key leaders would burnout or die before building a more sustainable business model. Their success was coming at a very high cost and he knew this model was unsustainable.

The Halpin Companies team started working with this leadership team to gather information and identify alternative approaches.

Fairly quickly, using our methods, we identified a potential future CEO from within the ranks. At first, the current leadership team was disdainful of our recommendation but this candidate did emerge over time as the key player with the greatest leadership capacity. He currently serves successfully in that CEO role.

More importantly, we were able to work with the two top layers of leaders and, based on our recommendations, build a more inclusive and transparent approach to driving new customer relationships.

Through mentoring by the senior leaders and using this more inclusive approach the former #1 sales person was able to build a dozen sales executives with his same level of success.

Using our processes he was first able to articulate his values – he cared deeply about their customers. He then started to articulate his sales approach – he was an extraordinary listener. We then helped him document and communicate his organic sales approach in meaningful and easy to understand ways. Over time, in one-on-one mentoring sessions, he trained each of his key people to replicate his success.

Not everyone had the same capacity but 14 or his 22 colleagues were able to step up. As a result the company grew by 300% in a few short years because of this velocity.

The CFO was thrilled, the shareholders were thrilled and more importantly, this construction-related company was able to sustain the economic downturn and continues to thrive today.

Six of the other colleagues self-selected out of this company with their dignity intact. Why did the go away? They saw that they could not be successful in the new business model. Two other leaders came to the leadership team and asked to take a step sideways or even backwards. They knew intuitively that they could not be successful in the new business model, given their own strengths.

When you harness the power you already have within your organization, the results will be extraordinary. Often our clients experience growth in shareholder value in amounts that were never imagined or forecasted. Building alignment, inclusiveness, and transparency drive success.

 

The Halpin Companies has been facilitating transitions in organizations of all sizes and levels of complexity since 1995. Our proven methods create work environments and corporate cultures where shareholder value grows consistently. Learn more about our methods at www.HalpinCompany.com

For a complimentary consultation, contact Katharine Halpin at 602-266-1961 or [email protected]

 

 

 

 

What’s needed today? A balanced perspective!

Meg Whitman, CEO Of Hewlett Packard said at the 2016 Davos World Economic Forum “My view is that the future belongs to the fast”.

Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce says frequently, “Speed is the new currency of business.”

I say yes, of course.  But at what cost?

Yes, we must all be agile, nimble and able to pivot quickly but how has this intense focus on responding to emails 24/7 and making quick decisions, cost us in terms of the quality of our decisions?

I’m pleased to see Dominic Barton, Global Managing Partner of McKinsey, and his colleagues have analyzed the benefits companies realize when they take a long-term perspective.

Today, our world is moving faster than ever. This pace and intensity requires leaders to be more grounded in the long-term view, what is important to them as individual leaders and what is most important to their organization, shareholders, their customers, their suppliers, and their employees. This grounding allows them to be agile while still making decisions in a consistent, disciplined manner.

McKinsey’s research indicates the increased value delivered by organizations with a long-term focus in terms of revenue, earnings, and economic profit translated into higher market capitalization: organizations with a long-term focus added $7 billion more in market capitalization on average than other firms between 2001 and 2014.

See their full report here by clicking here:

We have all been subjected to poor quality decisions made in haste. The world is moving faster than anyone could have imagined, even a decade ago. Strategic Planning is done in 18-month increments because none of us can predict beyond that short amount of time.  Because of this intense pace, leaders need the structure, discipline and accountability that occurs when they hold a long-term perspective.

I have seen the high cost that these short-term decisions made on the potential long-term success, as well as the current environment related to people, productivity and focus. Front-line leaders lose too much sleep when they experience unnecessary volatility in their focus.   The world around us presents volatility everyday. However, if leaders can maintain a long-term perspective, we can minimize this disruption to our people and our progress.

When a team takes on an 18-month project to build a better mousetrap and those team members sacrifice the quality of their lives and their time with their loved ones to purse their passions inside of this project, they do not take drastic change well.

When C-level leaders have a narrow perspective focused on this Quarter or next Quarter they tend to make volatile decisions that impact the viability and success of these longer-term initiatives.

A short-term focus invariably diminishes morale and employee engagement. Productivity, profitability and long-term success all take a hit as a result.

If I could dictate one thing to ever leader on the planet it would be to prescribe one hour of uninterrupted think time for every person currently in or aspiring to be in any kind of leadership role.

With this one-hour of strategic think time each day, consistently taken, leaders would start to have greater awareness about the red flags and key indicators that are always present but often overlooked.

This one practice would move leaders out of a frenzied and reactive mode into a strategic mode with a long-term focus, a broader perspective and a more consistent leadership style.

We must consider the unintended consequences of our actions and reactions. We cannot achieve a broad perspective without regular intervals of high quality solitude to think and then act strategically with a broad perspective about our long-term vision and goals.

Our economy depends on leaders who make decisions based on a longer-term perspective. McKinsey’s analysis indicates the organizations that held a longer-term perspective added nearly 12,000 more jobs on average than other organizations between 2001 and 2015.

Had all organizations created as many jobs as these longer-term focused organizations, the US economy would have added more than five million additional jobs over this period.

This suggests a potential value to our economy of more than a $3 trillion through 2025. This significant potential can be realized if we can support leaders in giving themselves the gift of regular intervals of strategic think time.

 

Katharine Halpin has been facilitating transitions in organizations of all sizes since 1995.  She founded The Halpin Companies to fill a void she saw everyday in her CPA career.  “Transactions and transitions fail to accomplish the forecasted shareholder goals simply because no one is focused on harnessing the power of the original enterprise.  Legal and Financial goals become the focus.  By focusing on leveraging the original enterprise by getting the right people in the right roles focused on the right priorities, organizations can grow by a factor of 200% to 300%”.

Katharine and her team have amassed a suite of tools and proprietary methods to exponentially increase shareholder value during a transaction or transition.

For a complimentary consultation, Katharine can be reached at 602-266-1961 or via email [email protected] To buy Katharine’s e-book about building in these reserves of time to think strategically, click here.